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  3. What’s the difference between our work types?
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  3. What’s the difference between our work types?

What’s the difference between our work types?

We provide accessible materials in a number of different forms, depending on what our clients prefer and what is suitable for their needs. Here’s a quick breakdown of our work types and the differences between them.

Captioning

Captions are small chunks of transcribed text that represent the audible content of a media file. The words in a caption will appear on-screen at the same time that the corresponding words are spoken. They may include sound effects and other meaningful information such as the tone of speech. Captions are split and positioned so they are easy to read and comprehend quickly.

Pay attention to task details to find input and output language. The completed captions or transcript must match the output language. Most tasks’ output language will be English.

Foreign language should be captioned with a descriptive label. Check out page 22 of the Recorded Media Style Guide for more information about captioning foreign language.

For more information on how to create high-quality captions, please see the Recorded Captioning Style Guide.

Subtitles

Subtitles are translated captions. For example, a French film might have English subtitles so that viewers who do not speak French can comprehend the dialogue. Subtitles are timed, split and positioned the same as captions. Pay attention to task details to find input and output languages. Input language is the language spoken in a file. Output language is the language the completed captions or transcript should be written in.

Transcription

A transcript is a single document (usually .doc, but sometimes .txt) that represents the audible content of a piece of media in text form. The text is broken into paragraphs that are easy to read and comprehend. Speaker changes will always be noted with a new paragraph and a speaker label.

It is extra important to capture all the details of the media (such as speaker changes), even if they are visible in the media. Descriptive labels such as (VIDEO PLAYS) and (READS FROM SLIDE) are insufficient to capture the full meaning of the audible content when creating transcripts. Often, the final reader of a transcript does not have access to the media and needs to be able to read all the audible content of a file in order to comprehend the meaning.

Retime

A retime task requires that a pre-existing caption file is reviewed for any errors and re-synced with the media. Retimes are often ordered for media files which have previously been captioned, but the captions need to be edited and retimed to fit the client’s needs.

A completed Retime task will reflect the following:

  • The words within the captions accurately represent all dialogue and other audible content of the file
  • The captions show the words on-screen at the same time they are spoken

Captions for retime tasks need to be edited to meet Ai-Media standards, found in the Recorded Captioning Style Guide.

Sync

A sync task requires a transcript file to be synced with the media to create captions. The content of the transcript does not need to be edited. The words are timed to appear on-screen at the same time that the corresponding words are spoken. Captions are split and positioned so they are easy to read and comprehend quickly.

Updated on July 14, 2020

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